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Expanded "Move Over" Law in Effect

Expanded "Move Over" Law in Effect

 

By Michael Wooten

CHEEKTOWAGA, N.Y. -- Starting midnight Sunday, New York's new "Move Over" law took effect, requiring drivers to slow down or move over for "hazard" vehicles including tow trucks.

The law already covers emergency vehicles, including police cruisers and fire trucks.

Last month, Kevin Woloszyn of Delevan in Cattaraugus County was driving Interstate 90 back to college outside Syracuse when his truck broke down. The tow truck driver who responded, Todd Young, was killed when a tractor trailer hit him.

"Just life, you can't take it for granted," Kevin said. "You know, you might be here one second, and the next second you're just out doing your job and that's it."

Kevin shared his story with 2 On Your Side in hopes it will cause drivers to be more careful around flashing lights. Kevin hopes the new law with also help.

FOLLOW UP: Other Cities Do It, Why Can't We?

FOLLOW UP: Other Cities Do It, Why Can't We?

UPDATE DECEMBER 29: The New York Times published a feature story on Monday saying that the city of Madrid, Spain has committed nearly $5 billion to cover a misbegotten, 1970s-era riverfront highway with a park. (That's a 5 followed by 9 zeros, folks.) The story has links to other projects, like Chicago's Millennium Park, that represent courage in the face of adversity to invest in the future of a city. At a mere $140,000,000 (which may well have been an inflated sum), Buffalo's Towpath Park would have been a bargain.

Agree? Disagree? What other projects could Buffalo take on to restore its vitality? Add your comments below.

Other Cities Do It, Why Can't We?

Other Cities Do It, Why Can't We?

The post-World War II highway construction boom that blasted its way through urban American neighborhoods in the latter half of the 20th century achieved its goal of streamlining automotive traffic, all right, but it had unintended consequences as well. Divided neighborhoods, urban flight, lost waterfront access, degraded quality of life -- all these ills have been blamed on the transportation miracle that tied America together in a ribbon of asphalt.

Winter Parking Bans in Your Town

Winter Parking Bans in Your Town

Amherst:

  • The Amherst Police would like to remind all citizens that the winter parking ban is now in effect. From November 1st until April 1st, there will be no overnight parking allowed on any Amherst street from 1 am to 7 am.

Cheektowaga:

  • The Cheektowaga Police would like to remind all citizens that the winter parking ban is now in effect. From November 1st until April 1st, there will be no overnight parking allowed on any Cheektowaga street from 1 am to 6 am. 

Clarence:

  • The Clarence Police would like to remind all citizens that the winter parking ban is now in effect.

Ford Friendship Express Program Unveils its “Redesign”

Ford Friendship Express Program Unveils its “Redesign”

Applications now available for local nonprofits; Recipients to be announced at Buffalo Auto Show in February

BUFFALO, N.Y. – The Ford Dealers of Western New York just couldn’t wait to announce that applications are now available for the 2012 Ford Friendship Express program -- an annual program that provides “new wheels” to local nonprofit organizations in need of transportation.

“For nearly two decades, the WNY Ford Dealers have awarded new Ford vehicles to deserving organizations in our community,” said Scott Bieler, chairman, Ford Friendship Express selection committee.

Nearly 100 Members Join Higgins, Slaughter, Hochul, Reed in Fight for Action on Aviation Safety

Directive on Pilot Fatigue Now Two Months Overdue

Congressmembers Brian Higgins (NY-27), Jean Schmidt (OH-2), Louise Slaughter (NY-28), Kathy Hochul (NY-26), and Tom Reed (NY-29) are continuing to keep up the pressure on completion of a federal aviation safety rule, now over two months delayed, and nearly 100 members of the House of Representatives are joining them in pushing for the rule to directly address issues related to pilot fatigue.    

“We are now 963 days past the horrific crash of Flight 3407 and with each tick of the clock without new pilot fatigue rules in place thousands of lives are put at risk,” said Congressman Higgins.   “Together we are sending a strong message that we can’t afford to put flight safety on standby.”

Erie County Residents Needed for Driving Behavior Study

 Erie County Residents Needed for Driving Behavior Study

Nearly 500 residents of Erie County N.Y. are being recruited for a Transportation Research Board (TRB) study on driving behavior.  This is part of the world's largest study of driver behavior, in which vehicle-mounted equipment will observe how drivers interact with traffic conditions and roadway design.  The data captured will be used for safety improvements in road design, cars, and driver training programs. 

Over the course of the two-year study, vehicles of 3,100 drivers in six test sites across the U.S. will be fitted with a special Data Acquisition System (DAS), which will collect both driver and vehicle performance data.  DAS technology includes forward radar, continuously recording video cameras, GPS, accelerometers, and other sensors.  Environmental variables such as traffic, lighting, and weather conditions will also be collected.